June 21, 2024

Makeda Wiedman

Peaceful Joy

The Tower of Juche Idea

Introduction

The Tower of Juche Idea is a national emblem of North Korea. It was built to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of North Korea. The tower stands on battlements, so it’s easy to see from a distance. Many people are curious about what this strange structure is and why it’s there.

The Tower of Juche Idea is a national emblem of North Korea.

The Tower of Juche Idea is a national emblem of North Korea. It’s the tallest monument in Pyongyang and was built to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the Korean Workers’ Party on October 10, 1982. The tower stands 173 meters high (568 feet), with its base measuring 55 meters (180 feet) across by 40 meters (130 feet) deep.

The structure was built by over 100,000 citizens who worked for three years straight without any days off or vacations in order to complete it before October 10th–the day that commemorated Kim Il Sung’s 70th birthday!

The tower itself has five floors: ground floor; first floor with exhibit halls dedicated to various aspects of North Korea’s history; second floor filled with paintings depicting scenes from Korean history through glass windows; third floor where there are more paintings inside an observation deck overlooking Pyongyang; fourth floor which houses an auditorium where speeches are given during national holidays such as Memorial Day on July 27th each year honoring those who died during World War II fighting against Japanese forces trying take over their homeland back then too!

It was built to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of North Korea.

The Tower of Juche Idea is a monument that was built in 1982 to commemorate the 70th anniversary of the founding of North Korea. It stands tall at a height of 150 meters (492 feet), making it one of the tallest structures in Pyongyang, and can be seen from many parts of the city.

The tower was constructed by workers from various companies across North Korea under guidance from Kim Jong-il (the son and successor of Kim Il-sung). It was designed as a symbol for his father’s leadership over their country, with each floor representing one year since his birth up until 1940 when he became president after Korea was liberated from Japanese rule at World War II ended.[1]

It stands on battlements, so it’s easy to see from a distance.

The Tower of Juche Idea is a massive structure, standing tall and wide. It’s so big that you can see it from your hotel room window!

The tower is made up of four levels: the first level houses a museum dedicated to Kim Il-sung’s life; the second level contains an auditorium where presentations are made about his teachings; the third level has rooms used for meetings by government officials; and on top of all this sits another lookout point with great views across Pyongyang city.

The tower was constructed according to Kim Il-sung’s own design.

The Tower of Juche Idea is a monolithic monument built by North Korea’s former leader, Kim Il-sung. It stands at 170 meters tall and was constructed in 1982 to commemorate the advent of his philosophy, Juche (meaning “self-reliance”). The tower is located on Mount Taesong near Pyongyang and can be seen from most parts of the city.

The structure itself consists of three floors: one underground level with an auditorium for holding meetings; a second floor which houses an observation deck; and finally a third floor that houses offices for party officials.

Many people are curious about what this strange structure is and why it’s there.

The Tower of Juche Idea is not a building, but a monument. It’s not a building, it’s an icon. The tower stands tall over the city, its image printed on everything from T-shirts to stamps to currency–and if you’re lucky enough to visit Pyongyang yourself, you may even get to see it with your own eyes!

But what exactly is this strange structure? And why did they build it?

Conclusion

The Tower of Juche Idea is one of the most iconic landmarks in North Korea. It’s also one of the most mysterious. The structure has many stories behind it, but none of them are clear or easy to verify. We do know that the tower was built at least partly according to Kim Il-sung’s own design and stands on battlements so that people can see it from far away–which makes sense given that this is an important symbol for North Koreans who live near where it stands today.